Tag Archives: nature

Nirvana :: RI

15 Oct
Nirvana :: RI

Nirvana :: RI

“Though my soul may set in darkness, it will rise in perfect light; I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night.” – Sarah Williams, Twilight Hours

The Milky Way season is winding down. 3/4 of a year has flown by. Does anyone else wonder where the time goes? I blinked and it’s officially the first day of fall.

On the plus side, that means apple cider donuts…

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Echoes :: VT

3 Oct
Echoes :: VT

Echoes :: VT

“Stars, too, were time travelers. How many of those ancient points of light were the last echoes of suns now dead? How many had been born but their light not yet come this far? If all the suns but ours collapsed tonight, how many lifetimes would it take us to realize we were alone? I had always known the sky was full of mysteries—but not until now had I realized how full of them the earth was.” -Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Last weekend was a new moon, and the close of what is generally considered to be milky way season for the year so I decided to go out with a bang. A long drive, a night hike through the woods with the dog, being serenaded by a chorus of wild animals, singing loudly to scare off any bears, telling the dog that, no, we were not chasing that Fisher cat…. You know, just another beautiful night under the stars. ♥️

Floating Along :: OR

25 Jun
Floating Along :: OR

Floating Along :: OR

 

When I was younger, I used to think that adults had it all figured out.  Now, I’m certain that adulting is a mix of taking guesses and muddling through the situations you find yourself in.  Going with the flow, if you will.

This shot was taken in Oregon, on the way to Tamanawas Falls.  It was a dang lovey hike, and the perfect way to start my visit to the Mt. Hood area.

The Restorative Effects of Landscape Photography

17 Jun

The newest article on the restorative effects of landscape photography is out in the current issue of On Landscape. Big thanks to Matt Payne over at F-Stop Collaborate and Listen podcast for his interview of William Patino. That was what sparked this article. Also, big thanks to David Pasillas, James Crouch of The Eye of the Mind Photography and Jennifer over at Art Therapy Nest in NY for helping me shape this article.

Give it a read, and let me know what you think! 😊

Falling :: CT

6 Jun
Falling :: CT

Falling :: CT

One good thing about all of the rain we’ve been having? The waterfalls are flowing nicely!

Heartwood :: WA

7 May
Heartwood :: WA

Heartwood :: WA

Three years ago I made my first trip to Oregon where I hiked through Opal Creek Wilderness.  The trail there is incredibly lush, with mossy halls and nurse logs for days.  In fact, that is where I learned what nurse logs were – a fallen tree that, as it decays, provides shelter and nutrients to seedlings.  That struck a cord for me.  Ever since then, nurse logs have made me smile when I stumbled upon them.  We all need help and protection somewhere along the way to help us thrive, and there is something heartwarming about the idea of the younger generations building upon the foundations of the generation before them in the hopes of growing to greater heights.  It’s a great metaphor for our own lives, and reminds me to appreciate all of the help I’ve had along the way in my own journey.

I have so much gratitude for all of the support that every one of you have given to me.  I’ve been fortunate enough to have some incredible mentors and photography friends who encourage me to be my best, and I feel motivated to work harder by all of your kind words, referrals for work, print purchases, etc.  You guys keep me reaching for new heights and I cannot thank you enough for your support over the years!

Nature First

30 Apr
Nature First :: WA

Nature First :: WA

 

Last week, Jennifer Renwick and Sarah Marino (both spectacular landscape photographers and humans!) approached me with a new initiative they are working on called “Nature First”.

In some ways, landscape photography is a double edged sword.  I think most of us get into this field because we love nature and want to celebrate and share the beauty of the world with others, in the hopes that we might inspire them to embrace nature as we have.  However, with the evolution of social media, and the affordability of travel, it’s become easier than ever for people to visit locations they’ve seen beautiful photos of…and without proper education and restraint, things can quickly get out of hand.  For example, a few weeks back, California experienced a super bloom of poppies – one of the most prolific years they’ve had in quite some time.  People flocked to see the flowers, to disastrous effect.   Tens of thousands of people descended on Lake Elsinore, and the popular Walker Canyon had to be shut down, as they could not accommodate the volume of visitors.  And the tourists themselves lacked the caution necessary to preserve such fragile locations, often straying from paths, disturbing wildlife (at least one rattlesnake bite was reported) and trampling huge swaths of the very thing they’d come to see.

In a similar example, just this past week, Panther Falls in Oregon closed the route to the lower falls because someone fell trying to see it.  That location was made popular by landscape photographers, and now, access is being restricted.

I cannot say that in my time as a photographer, I have never been careless, thoughtless or broken a rule I didn’t agree with.  But over time, I’ve come to realize that if I am to be a good steward for this planet, then I need to place its needs over the desire for a pretty shot.  I cannot assume that simply because I did the rock walk around fragile alpine that someone else will.  I can’t assume that because I know to keep a massive distance between myself and wildlife, and have access to a large zoom lens that someone else will.  I need to be more thoughtful in what I do, and just as importantly (if not more) in what I share, and how I share it.  Do I use my photos as teachable moments?  Do I use caution when posting fragile locations?  Am I doing my best to protect our green spaces?

To that end, Nature First has come up with a list of guidelines specifically for landscape photographers, in conjunction with the Leave No Trace principles.

 

1. Prioritize the well-being of nature over photography.

2. Educate yourself about the places you photograph.

3. Reflect on the possible impact of your actions.

4. Use discretion if sharing locations.

5. Know and follow rules and regulations.

6. Always follow Leave No Trace principles and strive to leave places better than you found them.

7. Actively promote and educate others about these principles

 

If you’re interested in learning more about the Nature First movement, or better yet, joining, you can read about it over at https://www.naturefirstphotography.org
 
Every single one of us has the ability to make a positive difference and use our voice for change.  What will you do with yours?