Tag Archives: nature

Using Your Art for Positive Change

13 Aug

Pretty excited to announce my article about using art to make positive changes in the world is now published in this month’s copy of @landscapephotomag ! If you have a subscription, be sure to check it out. 😊

Also feeling pretty dang grateful to share the pages with so many other talented photographers! And that cover photo by @j_r_moran_photography , amiright??!

Big thanks to @barber_gains and David Lovelace (the creative mind behind Cat Lazers) for their help while I was writing the piece, your insights were invaluable! 🎉🎉🎉 .
.
https://landscapephotographymagazine.com/magazine/issue-90/

Advertisements

Meandering :: CO

19 Jul
Meandering :: CO

Meandering :: CO

“A river cuts through rock not because of its power, but because of its persistence.” -James Watkins

I have a confession. I spent the last week watching telenovelas (soap operas).

Why, you ask? Because I was going to meet the grandfather (abuelo) of mi novio, and I haven’t practiced my Spanish in years. 😳

I learned a few things though. First, telenovelas are very dramatic. Second, his family got a kick out of that and recommended cartoons as well. Lol Third, his grandfather was happy that I tried.

We had a wonderful conversation about the importance of trying.  Grandpa was adamant that you needed to try new and difficult things in life. He reminded me that failing is part of the process but no progress would be made without putting yourself out there and putting in an effort, despite the challenges.

That’s some real life talk, right there. In photography, I always remind students that practice makes progress. More than that, though, it builds your confidence. By the end of last night, my brain was tired from the translations and concentrating (and from getting my a** whooped at dominoes 😑) but I was definitely feeling less anxious about the language barrier. I even made a few jokes in Spanish. *pats self on back*

So if you’re thinking you want to learn something new, I encourage you to do it. If you’re feeling discouraged, I hope you’ll keep working at it. Afterall, a baby step is still a step in the right direction. ❤️

 

Nerdy stuff: this is three blended exposures for focus stacking, used the big stop filter at time of capture. 😊

Migration :: CO

26 Jun
Migration :: CO

Migration :: CO

“It’s your pasture now, and it’s not so big–only three thousand miles from east to west, only two thousand miles from north to south–but all between, where ten thousand points of light prick out the cities, towns, and villages, there, seeker, you will find us burning in the night” -Thomas Wolfe

To me, this photo is one of journey and transition, like the snow melt’s path down the mountain. Similarly, like many Americans, I’ve been deeply troubled by the recent zero tolerance policy at the border that infringes on the human rights of children. Am I glad the practice of separating families has stopped for the moment? Yes. Am I concerned about the welfare of the 2000+ children in detention facilities since May? Yes. Am I worried the most recent executive order flies in the face of the court precedent preventing detention for longer than 20 days? Yes.

Do I have a solution? No.

I do know that thinking in absolutes is dangerous though. Very little in life is 100% black and white, and this idea that to be strong, we must give up compassion is immature. Compromise is a way forward. Understanding is a way forward. We are a nation of immigrants, many of whom were seeking asylum themselves. It’s foolhardy to label all asylum seekers as dangerous criminals and its unethical to treat people as animals or monsters. While I agree crossing borders illegally is, well, illegal…I also recognize we have a complex and confusing immigration system.

Do I want safeguards and background checks and asylum hearings in place? Yes. But I can I understand the urgency of some refugees situation that puts them in the difficult position of choosing to cross illegally? Also a yes.

I don’t know where the middle ground here is but my heart tells me without any doubts that our morals and ethical standards, and our compassion for people in need, should not be forsaken. I hope our Congress (contact your reps) can have some meaningful conversations in the coming days and get those children reunited with their families soon.

Fairy Falls :: CT

19 Jun

C1D92A80-0BD4-4679-B221-86A8B6EDA4A8

“And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.” Roald Dahl

This particular morning, nothing went according to plan. My Milky Way shot failed. Clouds rolled in and I thought I could recover the trip with a beautiful sunrise. Instead, I got a waterfall. But oh what a lovely waterfall it was!

Exciting news!

12 Jun

3382ABB6-D0C9-41C8-AF19-8990B094637D

Eye spy, with my little eye, my photo on the cover of the newest Light and Landscape magazine! 😊

If you have an iOS (iPhone or iPad) you can download the app for free through the App Store. Make sure to check out the newest article about the benefits and pitfalls of tourism and landscape photography!

The Walk to Eternity :: CT

6 Jun

EF1D0F7C-75BC-4E5B-BB72-92AB5AC049B9

In most areas of the East Coast of the US, light pollution is so prevalent that many people have gone their entire lives without every having seen the Milky Way. They don’t realize what they’re missing because to them, that’s just normal. Because it’s normal, they also don’t realize all of the problems that come along with light pollution- disrupted circadian rhythms and the health problems associated with that, disruption in migration patterns and growth cycles for flora and fauna, behavioral changes in animals, etc.

In a discussion I had with another photographer recently, another tragic consequence of light pollution is that people don’t get to experience the feeling of connection and perspective that comes from looking up at the night sky and realizing we are just a small part of a massive universe. We are beautiful specks of Star dust who have been given a precious gift – the opportunity to live our life on a rare habitable planet – and we shouldn’t take that for granted. Rather, through the stars, we should be reminded to live our lives as fully and beautifully as we are able.

This particular shot was taken last week in a little swath of dark-ish sky in CT. I had the joy of teaching night sky photography, and watching my student’s love for photographing the night sky grow in front of my eyes. It was a lovely experience. ❤️

Firestarter :: Iceland

12 Apr
Firestarter :: Iceland

Firestarter :: Iceland