Tag Archives: night photography

Bullseye :: CT

25 Apr

 

They say bad things come in 3’s, unless you’re one of the unfortunate few (me) for whom there is no limit to the amount of short straws you can draw at once. That means that like most stressed out Americans, I have a full complement of coping mechanisms.

 

Most of them involve alcohol and eating too much ice cream…er…I mean exercise and wholesome board games. But the best escape is through art! So sometimes when insomnia hits, I’ll take a drive with my camera.

 

This is the sort of magic I come home with….star trails obscured by a cloud bank and light pollution. Lol  At least it was pretty. 🙂

Want more info on how to make star trails?  Keep your eyes peeled for David and I’s next project!  You can sign up for our newsletter to stay informed about that.

Stardust and Dreams

6 Jan
Stardust and Dreams :: CA

Stardust and Dreams :: CA

“He stared up at the stars: and it seemed to him then that they were dancers, stately and graceful, performing a dance almost infinite in its complexity.” – Neil Gaiman

Growing up in Connecticut, I came to think of light pollution as the norm. It wasn’t until I started traveling that I realized how many stars there really are. Now, dark skies take my breath away every damn time.

This image was taken last month in Badwater Basin, Death Valley on a beautiful, cold, starry night.  In reality, it is a manual blend of two exposures.  The base image, exposed for the sky, didn’t retain much foreground detail.  I brushed in a little of a lighter exposure on the foreground in post processing.

Base Image:

iso 1600

30 sec

f/3.5

10 mm

5 Tips for Capturing the Northern Lights

22 Oct
Nubble Lights :: ME

Nubble Lights :: ME

‘Tis the season for the Aurora!

Looking for tips on photographing the Northern Lights? I did a write up on the subject here for The Outbound Collective! 🙂

Shoot for the Moon

1 Oct

Eclipse merge

Shoot for the moon.  Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars.

Of course, that’ll really only work out for you if you happen to be wearing a space suit…. haha

This past weekend we had a super blood moon eclipse.  I don’t recall ever seeing a lunar eclipse before that, and I have to say, it was pretty damn cool.

For those of you who missed it, this is a photo stack composite of the first 20 minutes of that eclipse.  These exposures are approximately 2 minutes apart.

As for the image itself…it’s not going to win any awards.  Unless you’re giving out awards for being awesome?  Yeah, it might win that. 😉  But it *is* an opportunity to talk about photographing the moon.

When you choose to shoot for the moon, you have to remember three things: underexpose the scene to properly expose the moon, large (to large-ish) aperture, and fast shutter speed.

The moon is very bright, and in order to catch the details on the surface, you need to under expose your image.  Otherwise, you’ll blow your highlights.  This is one of those times were it is okay to crush your shadows on the histogram!

In order to prevent the “starburst” effect, you need a wider aperture (aka f/lower number). I would say if you’re heading toward f/16 or higher, you may run into problems. Your camera’s sweet spot (generally f/9-f/11) or lower number will be a wide enough aperture to prevent the starburst effect.

Because our position in the surface of earth is constantly changing in relation to the moon, you will also need a fast shutter speed to prevent blur in your images.  That works out fine, though, since underexposing your image is part of the master plan!

To capture these exposures, I used a tripod and a 2 sec timer to avoid camera shake, a zoom lens, I put my camera into manual mode, and used the live view feature to focus manually. If your camera doesn’t have a live view feature, setting your focus to infinity should get you pretty close and you can tweak it from there.

The image settings are: ISO 100, 135mm, 1/500 sec, f/5.6

Happy shooting! 🙂