Tag Archives: night sky

Invasion :: Iceland

12 Dec
Invasion :: Iceland

Invasion :: Iceland

You know what’s incredible about Iceland?

Almost everything. Except the abundance of tourists. Particularly those who don’t respect the culture and beautiful spaces there.

Don’t get me wrong, I loved Iceland and would go back in a heartbeat. But I saw so many dangerous, rude and disrespectful things, even among my fellow photographers, which made me quite embarrassed for the lot of us. As a landscape photographer, I take protecting our collective “office” (aka nature, and access to spaces) pretty seriously. I love the fact that we are lucky enough to see, capture and share the beauty in this world and a few bad tourists have the ability to ruin it for the rest of us.

Do I love that the world is more connected and more people have access to see these wild, gorgeous spaces? Absolutely. But I hope more people will take care to respect those spaces. For example, maybe don’t cross the ropes to hang off of the edge of an eroding cliff or canyon overhang. Or, say, get too close to a beach known for rogue waves that drags people out to sea. Or…well…any of the bad behaviors you read about. Do your research, respect the culture and spaces, and we all win.

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Guide Us Home :: RI

18 Jul
Guide Us Home :: RI

Guide Us Home :: RI

In Connecticut, dark sky areas are almost non-existent, due to our dense population and the light pollution that comes with it.  That makes capturing the Milky Way very difficult.  To truly have a sky that is dark enough to see detail in the Milky Way core, I need to either drive to Rhode Island (where the is a tiny oasis of dark sky along our shared border) or north and/or northwest towards Massachusetts, Vermont or upstate New York.

So besides the inconvenience of needing to travel, why is light pollution a problem?  Because it isn’t just light.  It’s light that affects everything.

There is evidence that too much night-light will effect trees’ seasonal clocks.  It’s shown that the bright lights of human cities can disrupt migration patterns of birds, the ability of newly hatched sea turtles to find the safety of the water, the hunting and territory patterns of opportunistic animals…. and researchers are beginning to think that the disruption to our – humans – natural circadian cycles is a risk factor for higher incidences of cancer.

“The health effects of light pollution have not been as well defined for humans as for wildlife, although a compelling amount of epidemiologic evidence points to a consistent association between exposure to indoor artificial nighttime light and health problems such as breast cancer, says George Brainard, a professor of neurology at Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.” (here)

So about those pockets of darkness near Connecticut?  Well, Beavertail Light in Rhode Island is along the edge of one.  When my friend Tony Curado, who is working on a Galactic 50 project (capturing the Milky Way in all 50 states!), suggested he wanted to chase stars in my neighborhood, I knew exactly what location to try.

The night finally arrived, and as I sat there under the stars with Tony and Kyle (another local photographer), I felt grateful. There I was, watching the universe do its thing, the sounds of the waves kissing the land, and good friends to share it with.

Stargazing :: RI

22 Jun


A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of meeting up with an awesome group of photographers from CT and RI. It’s cheesy, but it was exactly the reason I love photography so much…we started as strangers and before the night was done, we were joking as if we were old friends. Old, under caffeinated, sleep deprived friends. 😋

 

Nerdy Stuff: This is a focus stack of two frames, one for the monocular and one for the Milky Way. Want to know more about shooting the stars or focus stacks? Just ask!

Bullseye :: CT

25 Apr

 

They say bad things come in 3’s, unless you’re one of the unfortunate few (me) for whom there is no limit to the amount of short straws you can draw at once. That means that like most stressed out Americans, I have a full complement of coping mechanisms.

 

Most of them involve alcohol and eating too much ice cream…er…I mean exercise and wholesome board games. But the best escape is through art! So sometimes when insomnia hits, I’ll take a drive with my camera.

 

This is the sort of magic I come home with….star trails obscured by a cloud bank and light pollution. Lol  At least it was pretty. 🙂

Want more info on how to make star trails?  Keep your eyes peeled for David and I’s next project!  You can sign up for our newsletter to stay informed about that.

Summer Nights & Lightning Strikes

25 Aug
Summer Nights :: CT

Summer Nights :: CT

 

These last few weeks have been full of pretty incredible storms.  It has been a great learning experience for me.  Obviously, safety is the number one concern with lightning shows.  Once you take the basic precautions, though, it’s interesting to focus on the absolute beauty that comes along with this powerful display.

This shot was taken in Bolton, CT at the heritage farm. f/2.8, 137 sec, ISO 100, 11 mm

Want to learn more about these sort of shots?  We teach both in the field technique, editing techniques, and run a structured, customized online lesson program.  Ask us for more details!

All We Are is Dust in the Wind….

18 Aug
Dust in the Wind :: CT

Dust in the Wind :: CT

 

Star trails over a still pond on a quiet summer night.

Nerdy stuff: About 5-6 stacked shots for the sky, one long exposure for the foreground.  Foreground Image EXIF of 175 seconds, f/2.8, ISO 320, 11mm